Michael Clarke and Simon Katich clash over Australian cricket’s non-aggression pact

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Clarke and Katich clash over Australian cricket's non-aggression pact

Michael Clarke and Simon Katich famously clashed physically at the dressing room when they were Test players and this week, they’ve become embroiled in a verbal disagreement over Australia’s dedication to become less aggressive about the pitch. 

Clarke joined a chorus of former players that have criticized the new ethos propagated in the wake of March’s ball-tampering scandal, saying Australia’s odds of succeeding will be jeopardized if their competitive streak had been hardened. 

“You do not need to be best mates with everybody. Australian cricket, I think, should quit worrying about being enjoyed and start worrying about being admired,” former Australia captain Clarke told Macquarie Sports Radio. 

Clarke established an impassioned defense against banned celebrity David Warner, the primary scapegoat from the Cape Town crisis who has been prohibited from leadership positions in the Australian group. 

India hasn’t won a Test series in Australia but has drawn three series Down Under in 1980-81, 1985-86 and 2003-04. 

The 30-year-old took global cricket by storm on his very first tour to Australia at 2007-08 when he bowled a magic spell to discount then-Aussie skipper Ricky Ponting from the historic 3rd Test in Perth in where India stunned the hosts to win the match by 72 runs. 

“It’s his style, he’s very upfront, in mind”. 

“If you are representing the country the stress is there, I think that it’s an excellent opportunity as well since you have a healthy competition in the team because you can find there a lot of fast bowlers coming up and if you are not doing well then any moment it’s possible to sit behind and observe the sport”, he explained. 

“Your greatest advantage might be your biggest weakness”. 

One of the findings of the Longstaff, Review was that on-field misuse of opponents was “normalized” along with a culture of “winning without even counting the cost” was sabotaged in the Australian sport. 

Katich thought Clarke had missed this point. “What has been forgotten in all this is we intentionally cheated and why we’re at this point now, and that which led us to the point, and we discuss the lineup that was talked about for so long,” he told SEN radio. 

“The point is we were caught for blatantly cheating and we have to rectify that as soon as you can earn the respect of the cricketing public in Australia and globally. 

“We’ve been a disliked team for quite a few years during that on-field behavior and it came to a head in Cape Town. They could play with the Australian way concerning playing competitive and enjoying quiet, but not going through the top and moving around the rules as they did in Cape Town.”