Andhadhun Movie Review: Ayushmann Khurrana, Tabbu, Radhika Apte

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Andhadhun Movie Review

The Grand Piano has made its come back after a decade. From a time of Anmol Gandhi, Andaz to Saajan, DDLJ it’s been important part of Indian movies. Each emotion us been carried out by the grand piano in Bollywood. In Andhadhun it came back into the hand of Ayushmann.

Andhadhun Movie Review

AndhaDhun unfolds primarily in three distinct spaces in Pune – a middle-class bachelor’s pad on Prabhat Road, an upscale Magarpatta City apartment of a former movie star, and a popular watering hole frequented by the well-heeled. Each of these locations has a grand piano. The instrument gives the film a lush soundscape all right but, in keeping with the spirit of the twisted tale, the sensations it triggers, underscores or accompanies are deliberately askew.

The plot, inspired by a duly acknowledged French short film, Olivier Treiner’s L’accordeur (The Piano Tuner, 2010), about a young musician who on a whim decides to act blind after failing to win the Bernstein Prize, rests on several acts that are either hard to fathom, if not outright inexplicable, or are unsettlingly abrupt: feigned blindness, a cold-blooded murder and cover-ups and conspiracies that go awry, among many other vicious instances of omission and commission.

The songs picturized on the genial man – the instrumental and vocal interludes are snatches from early 1970s movies starring Dhawan (Honeymoon, Piya Ka Ghar, Hawas, Annadata) – play a germane role in this spiffily scripted, superbly acted film. It serves up a cocktail of black humour, clever wordplay and a lively background score (composer Amit Trivedi also contributes a slew of original songs) to soften the shocks stemming from the actions of a bunch of cold, clinical, morally dodgy individuals grappling with life-threatening upheavals.